Tilt Shift is a piece written for cello and GrainPlane.

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Tilt–shift photography refers to the use of camera movements, often referring specifically to the use of tilt for selective focus for simulating a miniature scene. Rotation of the lens plane relative to the image plane is called tilt, and movement of the lens parallel to the image plane is called shift. Tilt is used to control the orientation of the plane of focus, and hence the part of an image that appears sharp.Tilting around the vertical axis results in a very small region in which objects appear sharp, the rest of the photo becomes blurry, out of focus. Shift is used to adjust the position of the subject in the image area without moving the camera back; this is often helpful in avoiding the convergence of parallel lines.

Tilt Shift is an experiment in focus and blur, in miniaturization and granularity conducted through a dialogue between an instrument I designed last year, an interface for granular synthesis and the cello. The GrainPlane live-captures snippets of the cello’s sound and breaks them into tiny pieces or auditory grains, each activated by a physical, tangible grain of rice or glass.

The piece required the addition of a few more features to the GrainPlane, most notably a mechanism to record audio from a live mic triggered via foot-pedal MIDI control, store it in an external buffer for playback reference.